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Subpart 22.4—Labor Standards for Contracts Involving Construction

22.400  Scope of subpart.

This subpart implements the statutes which prescribe labor standards requirements for contracts in excess of $2,000 for construction, alteration, or repair, including painting and decorating, of public buildings and public works. (See definition of “Construction, alteration, or repair” in section 22.401.) Labor relations requirements prescribed in other subparts of Part 22 may also apply.

22.401  Definitions.

As used in this subpart—

“Apprentice” means a person—

(1) Employed and individually registered in a bona fide apprenticeship program registered with the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, Office of Apprenticeship Training, Employer, and Labor Services (OATELS), or with a State Apprenticeship Agency recognized by OATELS; or

(2) Who is in the first 90 days of probationary employment as an apprentice in an apprenticeship program, and is not individually registered in the program, but who has been certified by the OATELS or a State Apprenticeship Agency (where appropriate) to be eligible for probationary employment as an apprentice.

“Construction, alteration, or repair” means all types of work done by laborers and mechanics employed by the construction contractor or construction subcontractor on a particular building or work at the site thereof, including without limitations—

(1) Altering, remodeling, installation (if appropriate) on the site of the work of items fabricated off-site;

(2) Painting and decorating;

(3) Manufacturing or furnishing of materials, articles, supplies, or equipment on the site of the building or work;

(4) Transportation of materials and supplies between the site of the work within the meaning of paragraphs (1)(i) and (ii) of the “site of the work” definition of this section, and a facility which is dedicated to the construction of the building or work and is deemed part of the site of the work within the meaning of paragraph (2) of the “site of work” definition of this section; and

(5) Transportation of portions of the building or work between a secondary site where a significant portion of the building or work is constructed, which is part of the “site of the work” definition in paragraph (1)(ii) of this section, and the physical place or places where the building or work will remain (paragraph (1)(i) in the “site of the work” definition of this section).

“Laborers or mechanics.”—

(1) Means—  

(i) Workers, utilized by a contractor or subcontractor at any tier, whose duties are manual or physical in nature (including those workers who use tools or who are performing the work of a trade), as distinguished from mental or managerial;

(ii) Apprentices, trainees, helpers, and, in the case of contracts subject to the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act, watchmen and guards;

(iii) Working foremen who devote more than 20 percent of their time during a workweek performing duties of a laborer or mechanic, and who do not meet the criteria of 29 CFR part 541, for the time so spent; and

(iv) Every person performing the duties of a laborer or mechanic, regardless of any contractual relationship alleged to exist between the contractor and those individuals; and

(2) Does not include workers whose duties are primarily executive, supervisory (except as provided in paragraph (1)(iii) of this definition), administrative, or clerical, rather than manual. Persons employed in a bona fide executive, administrative, or professional capacity as defined in 29 CFR part 541 are not deemed to be laborers or mechanics.

“Public building or public work” means building or work, the construction, prosecution, completion, or repair of which, as defined in this section, is carried on directly by authority of, or with funds of, a Federal agency to serve the interest of the general public regardless of whether title thereof is in a Federal agency.

“Site of the work.”— 

(1) Means—

(i) The primary site of the work. The physical place or places where the construction called for in the contract will remain when work on it is completed; and

(ii) The secondary site of the work, if any. Any other site where a significant portion of the building or work is constructed, provided that such site is—

(A) Located in the United States; and

(B) Established specifically for the performance of the contract or project;

(2) Except as provided in paragraph (3) of this definition, includes fabrication plants, mobile factories, batch plants, borrow pits, job headquarters, tool yards, etc., provided—

(i) They are dedicated exclusively, or nearly so, to performance of the contract or project; and

(ii) They are adjacent or virtually adjacent to the “primary site of the work” as defined in paragraphs (1)(i) of “the secondary site of the work” as defined in paragraph (1)(ii) of this definition;

(3) Does not include permanent home offices, branch plant establishments, fabrication plants, or tool yards of a contractor or subcontractor whose locations and continuance in operation are determined wholly without regard to a particular Federal contract or project. In addition, fabrication plants, batch plants, borrow pits, job headquarters, yards, etc., of a commercial or material supplier which are established by a supplier of materials for the project before opening of bids and not on the project site, are not included in the “site of the work.” Such permanent, previously established facilities are not a part of the “site of the work”, even if the operations for a period of time may be dedicated exclusively, or nearly so, to the performance of a contract.

“Trainee” means a person registered and receiving on-the-job training in a construction occupation under a program which has been approved in advance by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, Office of Apprenticeship Training, Employer, and Labor Services (OATELS), as meeting its standards for on-the-job training programs and which has been so certified by that Administration.

“Wages” means the basic hourly rate of pay; any contribution irrevocably made by a contractor or subcontractor to a trustee or to a third person pursuant to a bona fide fringe benefit fund, plan, or program; and the rate of costs to the contractor or subcontractor which may be reasonably anticipated in providing bonafide fringe benefits to laborers and mechanics pursuant to an enforceable commitment to carry out a financially responsible plan or program, which was communicated in writing to the laborers and mechanics affected. The fringe benefits enumerated in the Davis-Bacon Act include medical or hospital care, pensions on retirement or death, compensation for injuries or illness resulting from occupational activity, or insurance to provide any of the foregoing; unemployment benefits; life insurance, disability insurance, sickness insurance, or accident insurance; vacation or holiday pay; defraying costs of apprenticeship or other similar programs; or other bona fide fringe benefits. Fringe benefits do not include benefits required by other Federal, State, or local law.

22.402  Applicability.

(a) Contracts for construction work.

(1) The requirements of this subpart apply—

(i) Only if the construction work is, or reasonably can be foreseen to be, performed at a particular site so that wage rates can be determined for the locality, and only to construction work that is performed by laborers and mechanics at the site of the work;

(ii) To dismantling, demolition, or removal of improvements if a part of the construction contract, or if construction at that site is anticipated by another contract as provided in Subpart 37.3;

(iii) To the manufacture or fabrication of construction materials and components conducted in connection with the construction and on the site of the work by the contractor or a subcontractor under a contract otherwise subject to this subpart; and

(iv) To painting of public buildings or public works, whether performed in connection with the original construction or as alteration or repair of an existing structure.

(2) The requirements of this subpart do not apply to—

(i) The manufacturing of components or materials off the site of the work or their subsequent delivery to the site by the commercial supplier or materialman;

(ii) Contracts requiring construction work that is so closely related to research, experiment, and development that it cannot be performed separately, or that is itself the subject of research, experiment, or development (see paragraph (b) of this section for applicability of this subpart to research and development contracts or portions thereof involving construction, alteration, or repair of a public building or public work);

(iii) Employees of railroads operating under collective bargaining agreements that are subject to the Railway Labor Act; or

(iv) Employees who work at contractors’ or subcontractors’ permanent home offices, fabrication shops, or tool yards not located at the site of the work. However, if the employees go to the site of the work and perform construction activities there, the requirements of this subpart are applicable for the actual time so spent, not including travel unless the employees transport materials or supplies to or from the site of the work.

(b) Nonconstruction contracts involving some construction work.

(1) The requirements of this subpart apply to construction work to be performed as part of nonconstruction contracts (supply, service, research and development, etc.) if—

(i) The construction work is to be performed on a public building or public work;

(ii) The contract contains specific requirements for a substantial amount of construction work exceeding the monetary threshold for application of the Davis-Bacon Act (the word “substantial” relates to the type and quantity of construction work to be performed and not merely to the total value of construction work as compared to the total value of the contract); and

(iii) The construction work is physically or functionally separate from, and is capable of being performed on a segregated basis from, the other work required by the contract.

(2) The requirements of this subpart do not apply if—

(i) The construction work is incidental to the furnishing of supplies, equipment, or services (for example, the requirements do not apply to simple installation or alteration at a public building or public work that is incidental to furnishing supplies or equipment under a supply contract; however, if a substantial and segregable amount of construction, alteration, or repair is required, such as for installation of heavy generators or large refrigerator systems or for plant modification or rearrangement, the requirements of this subpart apply); or

(ii) The construction work is so merged with non- construction work or so fragmented in terms of the locations or time spans in which it is to be performed, that it is not capable of being segregated as a separate contractual requirement.

22.403  Statutory and regulatory requirements.

22.403-1  Davis-Bacon Act.

The Davis-Bacon Act (40 U.S.C. 3141 et seq.) provides that contracts in excess of $2,000 to which the United States or the District of Columbia is a party for construction, alteration, or repair (including painting and decorating) of public buildings or public works within the United States, shall contain a clause (see 52.222-6) that no laborer or mechanic employed directly upon the site of the work shall receive less than the prevailing wage rates as determined by the Secretary of Labor.

22.403-2  Copeland Act.

The Copeland (Anti-Kickback) Act (18 U.S.C. 874 and 40 U.S.C. 3145) makes it unlawful to induce, by force, intimidation, threat of procuring dismissal from employment, or otherwise, any person employed in the construction or repair of public buildings or public works, financed in whole or in part by the United States, to give up any part of the compensation to which that person is entitled under a contract of employment. The Copeland Act also requires each contractor and subcontractor to furnish weekly a statement of compliance with respect to the wages paid each employee during the preceding week. Contracts subject to the Copeland Act shall contain a clause (see 52.222-10) requiring contractors and subcontractors to comply with the regulations issued by the Secretary of Labor under the Copeland Act.

22.403-3  Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act.

The Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act (40 U.S.C. 3701 et seq.) requires that certain contracts (see 22.305) contain a clause (see 52.222-4) specifying that no laborer or mechanic doing any part of the work contemplated by the contract shall be required or permitted to work more than 40 hours in any workweek unless paid for all additional hours at not less than 1 1/2 times the basic rate of pay (see 22.301).

22.403-4  Department of Labor regulations.

(a) Under the statutes referred to in this 22.403 and Reorganization Plan No. 14 of 1950 (3 CFR 1949-53 Comp, p. 1007), the Secretary of Labor has issued regulations in Title 29, Subtitle A, Code of Federal Regulations, prescribing standards and procedures to be observed by the Department of Labor and the Federal contracting agencies. Those standards and procedures applicable to contracts involving construction are implemented in this subpart.

(b) The Department of Labor regulations include—

(1) Part 1, relating to Davis-Bacon Act minimum wage rates;

(2) Part 3, relating to the Copeland (Anti-Kickback) Act and requirements for submission of weekly statements of compliance and the preservation and inspection of weekly payroll records;

(3) Part 5, relating to enforcement of the Davis-Bacon Act, Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act, and Copeland (Anti-Kickback) Act;

(4) Part 6, relating to rules of practice for appealing the findings of the Administrator, Wage and Hour Division, in enforcement cases under the Davis-Bacon Act, Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act, Copeland (Anti-Kickback) Act, and Service Contract Act, and by which Administrative Law Judge hearings are held; and

(5) Part 7, relating to rules of practice by which contractors and other interested parties may appeal to the Department of Labor Administrative Review Board, decisions issued by the Administrator, Wage and Hour Division, or administrative law judges under the Davis-Bacon Act, Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act, or Copeland (Anti-Kickback) Act.

(c) Refer all questions relating to the application and interpretation of wage determinations (including the classifications therein) and the interpretation of the Department of Labor regulations in this subsection to the Administrator, Wage and Hour Division.

22.404  Davis-Bacon Act wage determinations.

The Department of Labor is responsible for issuing wage determinations reflecting prevailing wages, including fringe benefits. The wage determinations apply only to those laborers and mechanics employed by a contractor upon the site of the work including drivers who transport to or from the site materials and equipment used in the course of contract operations. Determinations are issued for different types of construction, such as building, heavy, highway, and residential (referred to as rate schedules), and apply only to the types of construction designated in the determination.

22.404-1  Types of wage determinations.

(a) General wage determinations.

(1) A general wage determination contains prevailing wage rates for the types of construction designated in the determination, and is used in contracts performed within a specified geographical area. General wage determinations contain no expiration date and remain valid until modified, superseded, or canceled by the Department of Labor. Once incorporated in a contract, a general wage determination normally remains effective for the life of the contract, unless the contracting officer exercises an option to extend the term of the contract (see 22.404-12). These determinations shall be used whenever possible. They are issued at the discretion of the Department of Labor either upon receipt of an agency request or on the Department of Labor’s own initiative.

(2) General wage determinations are published on the WDOL website. General wage determinations are effective on the publication date of the wage determination or upon receipt of the wage determination by the contracting agency, whichever occurs first. “Publication” within the meaning of this section shall occur on the first date the wage determination is published on the WDOL. Archived Davis-Bacon Act general wage determinations that are no longer current may be accessed in the “Archived DB WD” database on WDOL for information purposes only. Contracting officers may not use an archived wage determination in a contract action without obtaining prior approval of the Department of Labor. To obtain prior approval, contact the Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division, using http://www.dol.gov/esa, or contact the procurement agency labor advisor listed on http://www.wdol.gov.

(b) Project wage determinations. A project wage determination is issued at the specific request of a contracting agency. It is used only when no general wage determination applies, and is effective for 180 calendar days from the date of the determination. However, if a determination expires before contract award, it may be possible to obtain an extension to the 180-day life of the determination (see 22.404-5(b)(2)). Once incorporated in a contract, a project wage determination normally remains effective for the life of the contract, unless the contracting officer exercises an option to extend the term of the contract (see 22.404-12).

22.404-2  General requirements.

(a) The contracting officer must incorporate only the appropriate wage determinations in solicitations and contracts and must designate the work to which each determination or part thereof applies. The contracting officer must not include project wage determinations in contracts or options other than those for which they are issued. When exercising an option to extend the term of a contract, the contracting officer must select the most current wage determination(s) from the same schedule(s) as the wage determination(s) incorporated into the contract.

(b) If the wage determination is a general wage determination or a project wage determination containing more than one rate schedule, the contracting officer shall either include only the rate schedules that apply to the particular types of construction (building, heavy, highway, etc.) or include the entire wage determination and clearly indicate the parts of the work to which each rate schedule shall be applied. Inclusion by reference is not permitted.

(c) The Wage and Hour Division has issued the following general guidelines for use in selecting the proper schedule(s) of wage rates:

(1) Building construction is generally the construction of sheltered enclosures with walk-in access, for housing persons, machinery, equipment, or supplies. It typically includes all construction of such structures, installation of utilities and equipment (both above and below grade level), as well as incidental grading, utilities and paving, unless there is an established area practice to the contrary.

(2) Residential construction is generally the construction, alteration, or repair of single family houses or apartment buildings of no more than four (4) stories in height, and typically includes incidental items such as site work, parking areas, utilities, streets and sidewalks, unless there is an established area practice to the contrary.

(3) Highway construction is generally the construction, alteration, or repair of roads, streets, highways, runways, taxiways, alleys, parking areas, and other similar projects that are not incidental to “building,” “residential,” or “heavy” construction.

(4) Heavy construction includes those projects that are not properly classified as either “building,” “residential,” or “highway,” and is of a catch-all nature. Such heavy projects may sometimes be distinguished on the basis of their individual characteristics, and separate schedules issued (e.g.,“dredging,” “water and sewer line,” “dams,” “flood control,” etc.).

(5) When the nature of a project is not clear, it is necessary to look at additional factors, with primary consideration given to locally established area practices. If there is any doubt as to the proper application of wage rate schedules to the type or types of construction involved, guidance shall be sought before the opening of bids, or receipt of best and final offers, from the Administrator, Wage and Hour Division. Further examples are contained in Department of Labor All Agency Memoranda Numbers 130 and 131.

22.404-3  Procedures for requesting wage determinations.

(a) General wage determinations. If there is a general wage determination on the WDOL website applicable to the project, the agency may use it without notifying the Department of Labor. When necessary, a request for a general wage determination may be made by submitting Standard Form (SF) 308, Request for Determination and Response to Request (see 53.301-308), to the Administrator, Wage and Hour Division, Attention: Branch of Construction Contract Wage Determinations, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20210.

(b) Project wage determinations. If a general wage determination is not available on WDOL, a contracting agency shall submit requests for project wage determinations on SF 308 to the Department of Labor. The requests shall include the following information:

(1) The location, including the county (or other civil subdivision) and State in which the proposed project is located.

(2) The name of the project and a sufficiently detailed description of the work to indicate the types of construction involved (e.g., building, heavy, highway, residential, or other type).

(3) Any available pertinent wage payment information, unless wage patterns in the area are clearly established.

(4) The estimated cost of each project.

(5) All the classifications of laborers and mechanics likely to be employed.

(c) Time for submission of requests.

(1) The time required by the Department of Labor for processing requests for project wage determinations varies according to the facts and circumstances in each case. An agency should expect the processing to take at least 30 days. Accordingly, agencies should submit requests for project wage determinations for the primary site of the work to the Department of Labor at least 45 days (60 days if possible) before issuing the solicitation or exercising an option to extend the term of a contract.

(2) Agencies should promptly submit to the Department of Labor an offeror’s request for a project wage determination for a secondary site of the work.

(d) Review of wage determinations. Immediately upon receipt, the contracting agency shall examine the wage determination and inform the Department of Labor of any changes necessary or appropriate to correct errors. Private parties requesting changes should be advised to submit their requests to the Department of Labor.

22.404-4  Solicitations issued without wage determinations for the primary site of the work.

(a) If a solicitation is issued before the wage determination for the primary site of the work is obtained, a notice shall be included in the solicitation that the schedule of minimum wage rates to be paid under the contract will be issued as an amendment to the solicitation.

(b) In sealed bidding, bids may not be opened until a reasonable time after the wage determination for the primary site of the work has been furnished to all bidders.

(c) In negotiated acquisitions, the contracting officer may open proposals and conduct negotiations before obtaining the wage determination for the primary site of the work. However, the contracting officer shall incorporate the wage determination for the primary site of the work into the solicitation before submission of best and final offers.

22.404-5  Expiration of project wage determinations.

(a) The contracting officer shall make every effort to ensure that contract award is made before expiration of the project wage determination included in the solicitation.

(b) The following procedure applies when contracting by sealed bidding:

(1) If a project wage determination for the primary site of the work expires before bid opening, or if it appears before bid opening that a project wage determination may expire before award, the contracting officer shall request a new determination early enough to ensure its receipt before bid opening. If necessary, the contracting officer shall postpone the bid opening date to allow a reasonable time to obtain the determination, amend the solicitation to incorporate the new determination, and permit bidders to amend their bids. If the new determination does not change the wage rates and would not warrant amended bids, the contracting officer shall amend the solicitation to include the number and date of the new determination.

(2) If a project wage determination for the primary site of the work expires after bid opening but before award, the contracting officer shall request an extension of the project wage determination expiration date from the Administrator, Wage and Hour Division. The request for extension shall be supported by a written finding, which shall include a brief statement of factual support, that the extension is necessary and proper in the public interest to prevent injustice or undue hardship or to avoid serious impairment of the conduct of Government business. If necessary, the contracting officer shall delay award to permit either receipt of the extension or receipt and processing of a new determination. If the request is granted, the contracting officer shall award the contract and modify it to apply the extended expiration date to the already incorporated project wage determination. (See 43.103(b)(1).) If the request is denied, the Administrator will proceed to issue a new project wage determination. Upon receipt, the contracting officer shall process the new determination as follows:

(i) If If the new determination for the primary site of the work changes any wage rates for classifications to be used in the contract, the contracting officer may cancel the solicitation only in accordance with 14.404-1. Otherwise the contracting officer shall award the contract and incorporate the new determination to be effective on the date of contract award. The contracting officer shall equitably adjust the contract price for any increased or decreased cost of performance resulting from any changed wage rates.

(ii) If the new determination for the primary site of the work does not change any wage rates, the contracting officer shall award the contract and modify it to include the number and date of the new determination. (See 43.103(b)(1).)

(c) The following procedure applies when contracting by negotiation:

(1) If a project wage determination will or does expire before contract award, the contracting officer shall request a new wage determination from the Department of Labor. If necessary, the contracting officer shall delay award while the new determination is obtained and processed.

(2) The contracting officer need not delay opening and reviewing proposals or discussing them with the offerors while a new determination for the primary site of the work is being obtained. The contracting officer shall request offerors to extend the period for acceptance of any proposal if that period expires or may expire before receipt and full processing of the new determination.

(3) If the new determination for the primary site of the work changes any wage rates, the contracting officer shall amend the solicitation to incorporate the new determination, and furnish the wage rate information to all prospective offerors that were sent a solicitation if the closing date for receipt of proposals has not yet occurred, or to all offerors that have not been eliminated from the competition if the closing date has passed. All offerors to whom wage rate information has been furnished shall be given reasonable opportunity to amend their proposals.

(4) If the new determination for the primary site of the work does not change any wage rates, the contracting officer shall amend the solicitation to include the number and date of the new determination and award the contract.

22.404-6  Modifications of wage determinations.

(a) General.

(1) The Department of Labor may modify a wage determination to make it current by specifying only the items being changed or by reissuing the entire determination with changes incorporated.

(2) All project wage determination modifications expire on the same day as the original determination. The need to include a modification of a project wage determination for the primary site of the work in a solicitation is determined by the time of receipt of the modification by the contracting agency. Therefore, the contracting agency must annotate the modification of the project wage determination with the date and time immediately upon receipt.

(3) The need for inclusion of the modification of a general wage determination for the primary site of the work in a solicitation is determined by the date the modified wage determination is published on the WDOL, or by the date the agency receives actual written notice of the modification from the Department of Labor, whichever occurs first. (Note the distinction between receipt by the agency (modification is effective) and receipt by the contracting officer, which may occur later.) During the course of the solicitation, the contracting officer shall monitor the WDOL website to determine whether the applicable wage determination has been revised. Revisions published on the WDOL website or otherwise communicated to the contracting officer within the timeframes prescribed at 22.404-6(b) and (c) are applicable and must be included in the resulting contract. Monitoring can be accomplished by use of the WDOL website’s “Alert Service”.

(b) The following applies when contracting by sealed bidding:

(1) A written action modifying a wage determination shall be effective if:

(i) It is received by the contracting agency, or is published on the WDOL, 10 or more calendar days before the date of bid opening; or

(ii) It is received by the contracting agency, or is published on the WDOL, less than 10 calendar days before the date of bid opening, unless the contracting officer finds that there is not reasonable time available before bid opening to notify the prospective bidders. (If the contracting officer finds that there is not reasonable time to notify bidders, a written report of the finding shall be placed in the contract file and shall be made available to the Department of Labor upon request.)

(2) All written actions modifying wage determinations received by the contracting agency after bid opening, or modifications to general wage determinations published on the WDOL after bid opening, shall not be effective and shall not be included in the solicitation (but see paragraph (b)(6) of this subsection).

(3) If an effective modification of the wage determination for the primary site of the work is received by the contracting officer before bid opening, the contracting officer shall postpone the bid opening, if necessary, to allow a reasonable time to amend the solicitation to incorporate the modification and permit bidders to amend their bids. If the modification does not change the wage rates and would not warrant amended bids, the contracting officer shall amend the solicitation to include the number and date of the modification.

(4) If an effective modification of the wage determination for the primary site of the work is received by the contracting officer after bid opening, but before award, the contracting officer shall follow the procedures in 22.404-5(b)(2)(i) or (ii).

(5) If an effective modification is received by the contracting officer after award, the contracting officer shall modify the contract to incorporate the wage modification retroactive to the date of award and equitably adjust the contract price for any increased or decreased cost of performance resulting from any changed wage rates. If the modification does not change any wage rates and would not warrant contract price adjustment, the contracting officer shall modify the contract to include the number and date of the modification.

(6) If an award is not made within 90 days after bid opening, any modification to a general wage determination which is published on the WDOL before award, shall be effective for any resultant contract unless an extension of the 90-day period is obtained from the Administrator, Wage and Hour Division. An agency head may request such an extension from the Administrator. The request must be supported by a written finding, which shall include a brief statement of factual support, that the extension is necessary and proper in the public interest to prevent injustice, undue hardship, or to avoid serious impairment in the conduct of Government business. The contracting officer shall follow the procedures in 22.404-5(b)(2).

(c) The following applies when contracting by negotiation:

(1) All written actions modifying wage determinations received by the contracting agency before contract award, or modifications to general wage determinations published on the WDOL before award, shall be effective.

(2) If an effective wage modification is received by the contracting officer before award, the contracting officer shall follow the procedures in 22.404-5(c)(3) or (4).

(3) If an effective wage modification is received by the contracting officer after award, the contracting officer shall follow the procedures in 22.404-6(b)(5).

(d) The following applies when modifying a contract to exercise an option to extend the term of a contract:

(1) A modified wage determination is effective if—

(i) The contracting agency receives a written action from the Department of Labor prior to exercise of the option, or within 45 days after submission of a wage determination request (22.404-3(c)), whichever is later; or

(ii) The Department of Labor publishes the modification to a general wage determination on the WDOL before exercise of the option.

(2) If the contracting officer receives an effective modified wage determination either before or after execution of the contract modification to exercise the option, the contracting officer must modify the contract to incorporate the modified wage determination, and any changed wage rates, effective as of the date that the option to extend was effective.

22.404-7  Correction of wage determinations containing clerical errors.

Upon the Department of Labor’s own initiative or at the request of the contracting agency, the Administrator, Wage and Hour Division, may correct any wage determination found to contain clerical errors. Such corrections will be effective immediately, and will apply to any solicitation or active contract. Before contract award, the contracting officer must follow the procedures in 22.404-5(b)(1) or (2)(i) or (ii) in sealed bidding, and the procedures in 22.404-5(c)(3) or (4) in negotiations. After contract award, the contracting officer must follow the procedures at 22.404-6(b)(5), except that for contract modifications to exercise an option to extend the term of the contract, the contracting officer must follow the procedures at 22.404-6(d)(2).

22.404-8  Notification of improper wage determination before award.

(a) The following written notifications by the Department of Labor shall be effective immediately without regard to 22.404-6 if received by the contracting officer prior to award:

(1) A solicitation includes the wrong wage determination or the wrong rate schedule; or

(2) A wage determination is withdrawn by the Administrative Review Board.

(b) In sealed bidding, the contracting officer shall proceed in accordance with the following:

(1) If the notification of an improper wage determination for the primary site of the work reaches the contracting officer before bid opening, the contracting officer shall postpone the bid opening date, if necessary, to allow a reasonable time to—

(i) Obtain the appropriate determination if a new wage determination is required;

(ii) Amend the solicitation to incorporate the determination (or rate schedule); and

(iii) Permit bidders to amend their bids. If the appropriate wage determination does not change any wage rates and would not warrant amended bids, the contracting officer shall amend the solicitation to include the number and date of the new determination.

(2) If the notification of an improper wage determination for the primary site of the work reaches the contracting officer after bid opening but before award, the contracting officer shall delay awarding the contract, if necessary, and if required, obtain the appropriate wage determination. The appropriate wage determination shall be processed in accordance with 22.404-5(b)(2)(i) or (ii).

(c) In negotiated acquisitions, the contracting officer shall delay award, if necessary, and process the notification of an improper wage determination for the primary site of the work in the manner prescribed for a new wage determination at 22.404-5(c)(3).

22.404-9  Award of contract without required wage determination.

(a) If a contract is awarded without the required wage determination (i.e., incorporating no determination, containing a clearly inapplicable general wage determination, or containing a project determination which is inapplicable because of an inaccurate description of the project or its location), the contracting officer shall initiate action to incorporate the required determination in the contract immediately upon discovery of the error. If a required wage determination (valid determination in effect on the date of award) is not available, the contracting officer shall expeditiously request a wage determination from the Department of Labor, including a statement explaining the circumstances and giving the date of the contract award.

(b) The contracting officer shall—

(1) Modify the contract to incorporate the required wage determination (retroactive to the date of award) and equitably adjust the contract price if appropriate; or

(2) Terminate the contract.

22.404-10  Posting wage determinations and notice.

The contractor must keep a copy of the applicable wage determination (and any approved additional classifications) posted at the site of the work in a prominent place where the workers can easily see it. The contracting officer shall furnish to the contractor, Department of Labor Form WH-1321, Notice to Employees Working on Federal and Federally Financed Construction Projects, for posting with the wage rates. The name, address, and telephone number of the Government officer responsible for the administration of the contract shall be indicated in the poster to inform workers to whom they may submit complaints or raise questions concerning labor standards.

22.404-11  Wage determination appeals.

The Secretary of Labor has established an Administrative Review Board which decides appeals of final decisions made by the Department of Labor concerning Davis-Bacon Act wage determinations. A contracting agency or other interested party may file a petition for review under the procedures in 29 CFR Part 7 if reconsideration by the Administrator has been sought pursuant to 29 CFR 1.8 and denied.

22.404-12  Labor standards for contracts containing construction requirements and option provisions that extend the term of the contract.

(a) Each time the contracting officer exercises an option to extend the term of a contract for construction, or a contract that includes substantial and segregable construction work, the contracting officer must modify the contract to incorporate the most current wage determination.

(b) If a contract with an option to extend the term of the contract has indefinite-delivery or indefinite-quantity construction requirements, the contracting officer must incorporate the wage determination incorporated into the contract at the exercise of the option into task orders issued during that option period. The wage determination will be effective for the complete period of performance of those task orders without further revision.

(c) The contracting officer must include in fixed-price contracts a clause that specifies one of the following methods, suitable to the interest of the Government, to provide an allowance for any increases or decreases in labor costs that result from the inclusion of the current wage determination at the exercise of an option to extend the term of the contract:

(1) The contracting officer may provide the offerors the opportunity to bid or propose separate prices for each option

period. The contracting officer must not further adjust the contract price as a result of the incorporation of a new or revised wage determination at the exercise of each option to extend the term of the contract. Generally, this method is used in construction-only contracts (with options to extend the term) that are not expected to exceed a total of 3 years.

(2) The contracting officer may include in the contract a separately specified pricing method that permits an adjustment to the contract price or contract labor unit price at the exercise of each option to extend the term of the contract. At the time of option exercise, the contracting officer must incorporate a new wage determination into the contract, and must apply the specific pricing method to calculate the contract price adjustment. An example of a contract pricing method that the contracting officer might separately specify is incorporation in the solicitation and resulting contract of the pricing data from an annually published unit pricing book (e.g., the U.S. Army Computer-Aided Cost Estimating System or similar commercial product), which is multiplied in the contract by a factor proposed by the contractor (e.g., .95 or 1.1). At option exercise, the contracting officer incorporates the pricing data from the latest annual edition of the unit pricing book, multiplied by the factor agreed to in the basic contract. The contracting officer must not further adjust the contract price as a result of the incorporation of the new or revised wage determination.

(3) The contracting officer may provide for a contract price adjustment based solely on a percentage rate determined by the contracting officer using a published economic indicator incorporated into the solicitation and resulting contract. At the exercise of each option to extend the term of the contract, the contracting officer will apply the percentage rate, based on the economic indicator, to the portion of the contract price or contract unit price designated in the contract clause as labor costs subject to the provisions of the Davis-Bacon Act. The contracting officer must insert 50 percent as the estimated portion of the contract price that is labor unless the contracting officer determines, prior to issuance of the solicitation, that a different percentage is more appropriate for a particular contract or requirement. This percentage adjustment to the designated labor costs must be the only adjustment made to cover increases in wages and/or benefits resulting from the incorporation of a new or revised wage determination at the exercise of the option.

(4) The contracting officer may provide a computation method to adjust the contract price to reflect the contractor’s actual increase or decrease in wages and fringe benefits (combined) to the extent that the increase is made to comply with, or the decrease is voluntarily made by the contractor as a result of incorporation of, a new or revised wage determination at the exercise of the option to extend the term of the contract. Generally, this method is appropriate for use only if contract requirements are predominately services subject to the Service Contract Act and the construction requirements are substantial and segregable. The methods used to adjust the contract price for the service requirements and the construction requirements would be similar.

22.405  [Reserved]

22.406  Administration and enforcement.

22.406-1  Policy.

(a) General. Contracting agencies are responsible for ensuring the full and impartial enforcement of labor standards in the administration of construction contracts. Contracting agencies shall maintain an effective program that shall include—

(1) Ensuring that contractors and subcontractors are informed, before commencement of work, of their obligations under the labor standards clauses of the contract;

(2) Adequate payroll reviews, on-site inspections, and employee interviews to determine compliance by the contractor and subcontractors, and prompt initiation of corrective action when required;

(3) Prompt investigation and disposition of complaints; and

(4) Prompt submission of all reports required by this subpart.

(b) Preconstruction letters and conferences. Before construction begins, the contracting officer shall inform the contractor of the labor standards clauses and wage determination requirements of the contract and of the contractor’s and any subcontractor’s responsibilities under the contract. Unless it is clear that the contractor is fully aware of the requirements, the contracting officer shall issue an explanatory letter and/or arrange a conference with the contractor promptly after award of the contract.

22.406-2  Wages, fringe benefits, and overtime.

(a) In computing wages paid to a laborer or mechanic, the contractor may include only the following items:

(1) Amounts paid in cash to the laborer or mechanic, or deducted from payments under the conditions set forth in 29 CFR 3.5.

(2) Contributions (except those required by Federal, State, or local law) the contractor makes irrevocably to a trustee or a third party under any bona fide plan or program to provide for medical or hospital care, pensions, compensation for injuries or illness resulting from occupational activity, unemployment benefits, life insurance, disability and sickness insurance, accident insurance, or any other bona fide fringe benefit.

(3) Other contributions or anticipated costs for bona fide fringe benefits to the extent expressly approved by the Secretary of Labor.

(b)(1) The contractor may satisfy the obligation under the clause at 52.222-6, Davis-Bacon Act, by providing wages consisting of any combination of contributions or costs as specified in paragraph (a) of this subsection, if the total cost of the combination is not less than the total of the basic hourly rate and fringe benefits payments prescribed in the wage determination for the classification of laborer or mechanic concerned.

(2) Wages provided by the contractor and fringe benefits payments required by the wage determination may include items that are not stated as exact cash amounts. In these cases, the hourly cash equivalent of the cost of these items shall be determined by dividing the employer’s contributions or costs by the employee’s hours worked during the period covered by the costs or contributions. For example, if a contractor pays a monthly health insurance premium of $112 for a particular employee who worked 125 hours during the month, the hourly cash equivalent is determined by dividing $112 by 125 hours, which equals $0.90 per hour. Similarly, the calculation of hourly cash equivalent for nine paid holidays per year for an employee with a hourly rate of pay of $5.00 is determined by multiplying $5.00 by 72 (9 days at 8 hours each), and dividing the result of $360 by the number of hours worked by the employee during the year. If the interested parties (contractor, contracting officer, and employees or their representative) cannot agree on the cash equivalent, the contracting officer shall submit the question for final determination to the Department of Labor as prescribed by agency procedures. The information submitted shall include—

(i) A comparison of the payments, contributions, or costs in the wage determination with those made or proposed as equivalents by the contractor; and

(ii) The comments and recommendations of the contracting officer.

(c) In computing required overtime payments, (i.e., 1 1/2 times the basic hourly rate of pay) the contractor shall use the basic hourly rate of pay in the wage determination, or the basic hourly rate actually paid by the contractor, if higher. The basic rate of pay includes employee contributions to fringe benefits, but excludes the contractor’s contributions, costs, or payment of cash equivalents for fringe benefits. Overtime shall not be computed on a rate lower than the basic hourly rate in the wage determination.

22.406-3  Additional classifications.

(a) If any laborer or mechanic is to be employed in a classification that is not listed in the wage determination applicable to the contract, the contracting officer, pursuant to the clause at 52.222-6, Davis-Bacon Act, shall require that the contractor submit to the contracting officer, Standard Form (SF) 1444, Request for Authorization of Additional Classification and Rate, which, along with other pertinent data, contains the proposed additional classification and minimum wage rate including any fringe benefits payments.

(b) Upon receipt of SF 1444 from the contractor, the contracting officer shall review the request to determine whether it meets the following criteria:

(1) The classification is appropriate and the work to be performed by the classification is not performed by any classification contained in the applicable wage determination.

(2) The classification is utilized in the area by the construction industry.

(3) The proposed wage rate, including any fringe benefits, bears a reasonable relationship to the wage rates in the wage determination in the contract.

(c)(1) If the criteria in paragraph (b) of this subsection are met and the contractor and the laborers or mechanics to be employed in the additional classification (if known) or their representatives agree to the proposed additional classification, and the contracting officer approves, the contracting officer shall submit a report (including a copy of SF 1444) of that action to the Administrator, Wage and Hour Division, for approval, modification, or disapproval of the additional classification and wage rate (including any amount designated for fringe benefits); or

(2) If the contractor, the laborers or mechanics to be employed in the classification or their representatives, and the contracting officer do not agree on the proposed additional classification, or if the criteria are not met, the contracting officer shall submit a report (including a copy of SF 1444) giving the views of all interested parties and the contracting officer’s recommendation to the Administrator, Wage and Hour Division, for determination of appropriate classification and wage rate.

(d)(1) Within 30 days of receipt of the report, the Administrator, Wage and Hour Division, will complete action and so advise the contracting officer, or will notify the contracting officer that additional time is necessary.

(2) Upon receipt of the Department of Labor’s action, the contracting officer shall forward a copy of the action to the contractor, directing that the classification and wage rate be posted in accordance with paragraph (a) of the clause at 52.222-6 and that workers in the affected classification receive no less than the minimum rate indicated from the first day on which work under the contract was performed in the classification.

(e) In each option to extend the term of the contract, if any laborer or mechanic is to be employed during the option in a classification that is not listed (or no longer listed) on the wage determination incorporated in that option, the contracting officer must require that the contractor submit a request for conformance using the procedures noted in paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section.

22.406-4  Apprentices and trainees.

(a) The contracting officer shall review the contractor’s employment and payment records of apprentices and trainees made available pursuant to the clause at 52.222-8, Payrolls and Basic Records, to ensure that the contractor has complied with the clause at 52.222-9, Apprentices and Trainees.

(b) If a contractor has classified employees as apprentices, trainees, or helpers without complying with the requirements of the clause at 52.222-9, the contracting officer shall reject the classification and require the contractor to pay the affected employees at the rates applicable to the classification of the work actually performed.

22.406-5  Subcontracts.

In accordance with the requirements of the clause at 52.222-11, Subcontracts (Labor Standards), the contractor and subcontractors at any tier are required to submit a fully executed SF 1413, Statement and Acknowledgment, upon award of each subcontract.

22.406-6  Payrolls and statements.

(a) Submission. In accordance with the clause at 52.222-8, Payrolls and Basic Records, the contractor must submit or cause to be submitted, within 7 calendar days after the regular payment date of the payroll week covered, for the contractor and each subcontractor, (1) copies of weekly payrolls applicable to the contract, and (2) weekly payroll statements of compliance. The contractor may use the Department of Labor Form WH-347, Payroll (For Contractor’s Optional Use), or a similar form that provides the same data and identical representation.

(b) Withholding for nonsubmission. If the contractor fails to submit copies of its or its subcontractors’ payrolls promptly, the contracting officer shall, from any payment due to the contractor, withhold approval of an amount that the contracting officer considers necessary to protect the interest of the Government and the employees of the contractor or any subcontractor.

(c) Examination.

(1) The contracting officer shall examine the payrolls and payroll statements to ensure compliance with the contract and any statutory or regulatory requirements. Particular attention should be given to—

(i) The correctness of classifications and rates;

(ii) Fringe benefits payments;

(iii) Hours worked;

(iv) Deductions; and

(v) Disproportionate employment ratios of laborers, apprentices or trainees to journeymen.

(2) Fringe benefits payments, contributions made, or costs incurred on other than a weekly basis shall be considered as a part of weekly payments to the extent they are creditable to the particular weekly period involved and are otherwise acceptable.

(d) Preservation. The contracting agency shall retain payrolls and statements of compliance for 3 years after completion of the contract and make them available when requested by the Department of Labor at any time during that period. Submitted payrolls shall not be returned to a contractor or subcontractor for any reason, but copies thereof may be furnished to the contractor or subcontractor who submitted them, or to a higher tier contractor or subcontractor.

(e) Disclosure of payroll records. Contractor payroll records in the Government’s possession must be carefully protected from any public disclosure which is not required by law, since payroll records may contain information in which the contractor’s employees have a privacy interest, as well as information in which the contractor may have a proprietary interest that the Government may be obliged to protect. Questions concerning release of this information may involve the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

22.406-7  Compliance checking.

(a) General. The contracting officer shall make checks and investigations on all contracts covered by this subpart as may be necessary to ensure compliance with the labor standards requirements of the contract.

(b) Regular compliance checks. Regular compliance checking includes the following activities:

(1) Employee interviews to determine correctness of classifications, rates of pay, fringe benefits payments, and hours worked. (See Standard Form 1445.)

(2) On-site inspections to check type of work performed, number and classification of workers, and fulfillment of posting requirements.

(3) Payroll reviews to ensure that payrolls of prime contractors and subcontractors have been submitted on time and are complete and in compliance with contract requirements.

(4) Comparison of the information in this paragraph (b) with available data, including daily inspector’s report and daily logs of construction, to ensure consistency.

(c) Special compliance checks. Situations that may require special compliance checks include —

(1) Inconsistencies, errors, or omissions detected during regular compliance checks; or

(2) Receipt of a complaint alleging violations. If the complaint is not specific enough, the complainant shall be so advised and invited to submit additional information.

22.406-8  Investigations.

Conduct labor standards investigations when available information indicates such action is warranted. In addition, the Department of Labor may conduct an investigation on its own initiative or may request a contracting agency to do so.

(a) Contracting agency responsibilities. Conduct an investigation when a compliance check indicates that substantial or willful violations may have occurred or violations have not been corrected.

(1) The investigation must—

(i) Include all aspects of the contractor’s compliance with contract labor standards requirements;

(ii) Not be limited to specific areas raised in a complaint or uncovered during compliance checks; and

(iii) Use personnel familiar with labor laws and their application to contracts.

(2) Do not disclose contractor employees’ oral or written statements taken during an investigation or the employee’s identity to anyone other than an authorized Government official without that employee’s prior signed consent.

(3) Send a written request to the Administrator, Wage and Hour Division, to obtain—

(i) Investigation and enforcement instructions; or

(ii) Available pertinent Department of Labor files.

(4) Obtain permission from the Department of Labor before disclosing material obtained from Labor Department files, other than computations of back wages and liquidated damages and summaries of back wages due, to anyone other than Government contract administrators.

(b) Investigation report. The contracting officer must review the investigation report on receipt and make preliminary findings. The contracting officer normally must not base adverse findings solely on employee statements that the employee does not wish to have disclosed. However, if the investigation establishes a pattern of possible violations that are based on employees’ statements that are not authorized for disclosure, the pattern itself may support a finding of noncompliance.

(c) Contractor Notification. After completing the review, the contracting officer must—

(1) Provide the contractor any written preliminary findings and proposed corrective actions, and notice that the contractor has the right to request that the basis for the findings be made available and to submit written rebuttal information.

(2) Upon request, provide the contractor with rationale for the findings. However, under no circumstances will the contracting officer permit the contractor to examine the investigation report. Also, the contracting officer must not disclose the identity of any employee who filed a complaint or who was interviewed, without the prior consent of the employee.

(3)(i) The contractor may rebut the findings in writing within 60 days after it receives a copy of the preliminary findings. The rebuttal becomes part of the official investigation record. If the contractor submits a rebuttal, evaluate the preliminary findings and notify the contractor of the final findings.

(ii) If the contracting officer does not receive a timely rebuttal, the contracting officer must consider the preliminary findings final.

(4) If appropriate, request the contractor to make restitution for underpaid wages and assess liquidated damages. If the request includes liquidated damages, the request must state that the contractor has 60 days to request relief from such assessment.

(d) Contracting officer’s report. After taking the actions prescribed in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this subsection—

(1) The contracting officer must prepare and forward a report of any violations, including findings and supporting evidence, to the agency head. Standard Form 1446, Labor Standards Investigation Summary Sheet, is the first page of the report; and

(2) The agency head must process the report as follows:

(i) The contracting officer must send a detailed enforcement report to the Administrator, Wage and Hour Division, within 60 days after completion of the investigation, if—

(A) A contractor or subcontractor underpaid by $1,000 or more;

(B) The contracting officer believes that the violations are aggravated or willful (or there is reason to believe that the contractor has disregarded its obligations to employees and subcontractors under the Davis-Bacon Act);

(C) The contractor or subcontractor has not made restitution; or

(D) Future compliance has not been assured.

(ii) If the Department of Labor expressly requested the investigation and none of the conditions in paragraph (d)(2)(i) of this subsection exist, submit a summary report to the Administrator, Wage and Hour Division. The report must include—

(A) A summary of any violations;

(B) The amount of restitution paid;

(C) The number of workers who received restitution;

(D) The amount of liquidated damages assessed under the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act;

(E) Corrective measures taken; and

(F) Any information that may be necessary to review any recommendations for an appropriate adjustment in liquidated damages.

(iii) If none of the conditions in paragraphs (d)(2)(i) or (ii) of this subsection are present, close the case and retain the report in the appropriate contract file.

(iv) If substantial evidence is found that violations are willful and in violation of a criminal statute, (generally 18 U.S.C. 874 or 1001), forward the report (supplemented if necessary) to the Attorney General of the United States for prosecution if the facts warrant. Notify the Administrator, Wage and Hour Division, when the report is forwarded for the Attorney General’s consideration.

(e) Department of Labor investigations. The Department of Labor will furnish the contracting officer an enforcement report detailing violations found and any corrective action taken by the contractor, in investigations that disclose—

(1) Underpayments totaling $1,000 or more;

(2) Aggravated or willful violations (or, when the contracting officer believes that the contractor has disregarded its obligations to employees and subcontractors under the Davis-Bacon Act); or

(3) Potential assessment of liquidated damages under the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act.

(f) Other investigations. The Department of Labor will provide a letter summarizing the findings of the investigation to the contracting officer for all investigations that are not described in paragraph (e) of this subsection.

22.406-9  Withholding from or suspension of contract payments.

(a) Withholding from contract payments. If the contracting officer believes a violation exists (see 22.406-8), or upon request of the Department of Labor, the contracting officer must withhold from payments due the contractor an amount equal to the estimated wage underpayment and estimated liquidated damages due the United States under the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act. (See 22.302.)

(1) If the contracting officer believes a violation exists or upon request of the Department of Labor, the contracting officer must withhold funds from any current Federal contract or Federally assisted contract with the same prime contractor that is subject to either Davis-Bacon Act or Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act requirements.

(2) If a subsequent investigation confirms violations, the contracting officer must adjust the withholding as necessary. However, if the Department of Labor requested the withholding, the contracting officer must not reduce or release the withholding without written approval of the Department of Labor.

(3) Use withheld funds as provided in paragraph (c) of this subsection to satisfy assessed liquidated damages, and unless the contractor makes restitution, validated wage underpayments.

(b) Suspension of contract payments. If a contractor or subcontractor fails or refuses to comply with the labor standards clauses of the Davis-Bacon Act and related statutes, the agency, upon its own action or upon the written request of the Department of Labor, must suspend any further payment, advance, or guarantee of funds until the violations cease or until the agency has withheld sufficient funds to compensate employees for back wages, and to cover any liquidated damages due.

(c) Disposition of contract payments withheld or suspended—

(1) Forwarding wage underpayments to the Comptroller General. Upon final administrative determination, if the contractor or subcontractor has not made restitution, the contracting officer must forward to the appropriate disbursing office Standard Form (SF) 1093, Schedule of Withholdings Under the Davis-Bacon Act (40 U.S.C. 276(a)) and/or Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act (40 U.S.C. 327-333). Attach to the SF 1093 a list of the name, social security number, and last known address of each affected employee; the amount due each employee; employee claims if feasible; and a brief rationale for restitution. Also, the contracting officer must indicate if restitution was not made because the employee could not be located. The Government may assist underpaid employees in preparation of their claims. The disbursing office must submit the SF 1093 with attached additional data and the funds withheld (by check) to the Comptroller General (Claims Section).

(2) Returning of withheld funds to contractor. When funds withheld exceed the amount required to satisfy validated wage underpayments and assessed liquidated damages, return the funds to the contractor.

(3) Limitation on forwarding or returning funds. If the Department of Labor requested the withholding or if the findings are disputed (see 22.406-10(e)), the contracting officer must not forward the funds to the Comptroller General, or return them to the contractor without approval by the Department of Labor.

(4) Liquidated damages. Upon final administrative determination, the contracting officer must dispose of funds withheld or collected for liquidated damages in accordance with agency procedures.

22.406-10  Disposition of disputes concerning construction contract labor standards enforcement.

(a) The areas of possible differences of opinion between contracting officers and contractors in construction contract labor standards enforcement include—

(1) Misclassification of workers;

(2) Hours of work;

(3) Wage rates and payment;

(4) Payment of overtime;

(5) Withholding practices; and

(6) The applicability of the labor standards requirements under varying circumstances.

(b) Generally, these differences are settled administratively at the project level by the contracting agency. If necessary, these differences may be settled with assistance from the Department of Labor.

(c) When requesting the contractor to take corrective action in labor violation cases, the contracting officer shall inform the contractor of the following:

(1) Disputes concerning the labor standards requirements of the contract are handled under the contract clause at 52.222-14, Disputes Concerning Labor Standards, and not under the clause at 52.233-1, Disputes.

(2) The contractor may appeal the contracting officer’s findings or part thereof by furnishing the contracting officer a complete statement of the reasons for the disagreement with the findings.

(d) The contracting officer shall promptly transmit the contracting officer’s findings and the contractor’s statement to the Administrator, Wage and Hour Division.

(e) The Administrator, Wage and Hour Division, will respond directly to the contractor or subcontractor, with a copy to the contracting agency. The contractor or subcontractor may appeal the Administrator’s findings in accordance with the procedures outlined in Labor Department Regulations (29 CFR 5.11). Hearings before administrative law judges are conducted in accordance with 29 CFR Part 6, and hearings before the Labor Department Administrative Review Board are conducted in accordance with 29 CFR Part 7.

(f) The Administrator, Wage and Hour Division, may institute debarment proceedings against the contractor or subcontractor if the Administrator finds reasonable cause to believe that the contractor or subcontractor has committed willful or aggravated violations of the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act or the Copeland (Anti-Kickback) Act, or any of the applicable statutes listed in 29 CFR 5.1 other than the Davis-Bacon Act, or has committed violations of the Davis-Bacon Act that constitute a disregard of its obligations to employees or subcontractors under Section 3(a) of that Act.

22.406-11  Contract terminations.

If a contract or subcontract is terminated for violation of the labor standards clauses, the contracting agency shall submit a report to the Administrator, Wage and Hour Division, and the Comptroller General. The report shall include—

(a) The number of the terminated contract;

(b) The name and address of the terminated contractor or subcontractor;

(c) The name and address of the contractor or subcontractor, if any, who is to complete the work;

(d) The amount and number of the replacement contract, if any; and

(e) A description of the work.

22.406-12  Cooperation with the Department of Labor.

(a) The contracting agency shall cooperate with representatives of the Department of Labor in the inspection of records, interviews with workers, and all other aspects of investigations undertaken by the Department of Labor. When requested, the contracting agency shall furnish to the Secretary of Labor any available information on contractors, subcontractors, current and previous contracts, and the nature of the contract work.

(b) If a Department of Labor representative undertakes an investigation at a construction project, the contracting officer shall inquire into the scope of the investigation, and request to be notified immediately of any violations discovered under the Davis-Bacon Act, the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act, or the Copeland (Anti-Kickback) Act.

22.406-13  Semiannual enforcement reports.

A semiannual report on compliance with and enforcement of the construction labor standards requirements of the Davis-Bacon Act and Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act is required from each contracting agency. The reporting periods are October 1 through March 31 and April 1 through September 30. The reports shall only contain information as to the enforcement actions of the contracting agency and shall be prepared as prescribed in Department of Labor memoranda and submitted to the Department of Labor within 30 days after the end of the reporting period. This report has been assigned interagency report control number 1482-DOL-SA.

22.407  Solicitation provision and contract clauses.

(a) Insert the following clauses in solicitations and contracts in excess of $2,000 for construction within the United States:

(1) 52.222-6, Davis-Bacon Act.

(2) 52.222-7, Withholding of Funds.

(3) 52.222-8, Payrolls and Basic Records.

(4) 52.222-9, Apprentices and Trainees.

(5) 52.222-10, Compliance with Copeland Act Requirements.

(6) 52.222-11, Subcontracts (Labor Standards).

(7) 52.222-12, Contract Termination-Debarment.

(8) 52.222-13, Compliance with Davis-Bacon and Related Act Regulations.

(9) 52.222-14, Disputes Concerning Labor Standards.

(10) 52.222-15, Certification of Eligibility.

(b) Insert the clause at 52.222-16, Approval of Wage Rates, in solicitations and contracts in excess of $2,000 for cost-reimbursement construction to be performed within the United States, except for contracts with a State or political subdivision thereof.

(c) A contract that is not primarily for construction may contain a requirement for some construction work to be performed in the United States. If under 22.402(b) the requirements of this subpart apply to the construction work, insert in such solicitations and contracts the applicable construction labor standards clauses required in this section and identify the item or items of construction work to which the clauses apply.

(d) [Reserved]

(e) Insert the clause at 52.222-30, Davis-Bacon Act—Price Adjustment (None or Separately Specified Pricing Method), in solicitations and contracts if the contract is expected to be—

(1) A fixed-price contract subject to the Davis-Bacon Act that will contain option provisions by which the contracting officer may extend the term of the contract, and the contracting officer determines the most appropriate contract price adjustment method is the method at 22.404-12(c)(1) or (2); or

(2) A cost-reimbursable type contract subject to the Davis-Bacon Act that will contain option provisions by which the contracting officer may extend the term of the contract.

(f) Insert the clause at 52.222-31, Davis-Bacon Act—Price Adjustment (Percentage Method), in solicitations and contracts if the contract is expected to be a fixed-price contract subject to the Davis-Bacon Act that will contain option provisions by which the contracting officer may extend the term of the contract, and the contracting officer determines the most appropriate contract price adjustment method is the method at 22.404-12(c)(3).

(g) Insert the clause at 52.222-32, Davis-Bacon Act—Price Adjustment (Actual Method), in solicitations and contracts if the contract is expected to be a fixed-price contract subject to the Davis-Bacon Act that will contain option provisions by which the contracting officer may extend the term of the contract, and the contracting officer determines the most appropriate method to establish contract price is the method at 22.404-12(c)(4).

(h) Insert the provision at 52.222-5, Davis Bacon Act—Secondary Site of the Work, in solicitations in excess of $2,000 for construction within the United States.


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